The Woodpeckers Guild

A Guild of Passionate Woodworkers

The Woodpeckers Guild is a club of passionate woodworkers. Our members are mainly located in Northern Baltimore County, although we have members from Baltimore City, Harford County and Carroll County. Woodpeckers members are heavily weighted towards furniture making although our member's abilities run the full spectrum of the fine woodworking craft.

Phil Briscoe

 Member Since 1986

Member Since 1986

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Kenny Stevenson

 Member since: 1996

Member since: 1996

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Don McInnes

 Member Since: 1997

Member Since: 1997

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Bill Mackey

 Member Since: 1999

Member Since: 1999

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Norm Molter

 Member Since: 2001

Member Since: 2001

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Bob Weimer

 Member Since: 2001

Member Since: 2001

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Mike Moriarity

 Member Since: 2004

Member Since: 2004

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Howard Butz

 Member Since: 2007

Member Since: 2007

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Dick Hollingshead

 Member Since: 2007

Member Since: 2007

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Mark Hochstein

 Member Since: 2008

Member Since: 2008

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I began woodworking in 1997 and was immediately bitten by the bug! I started at the base woodshop on Ft. Meade. I was living in an apartment at the time and the experience of sharing a shop and lugging my tools both ways quickly drove me to buy my first house so I could have a shop of my own. My first project was mission style blanket chest out of red oak. I really didn't know anything about woodworking then, but I was several books into the Time Life series on woodworking. One was a book on joinery which had nice drawings of all kinds of different joints but didn't really say when or how to use them. As a result I built a chest where every joint was a cross-grain glue joint. If you believe what you read in woodworking literature today about cross-grain glue joints that chest should have fallen apart years ago, but it's still as solid as a rock. I see that chest in my bedroom every day. It's a constant reminder to me that "perfect" in the enemy of "good enough". While I am constantly striving to improve my craft, sometimes you just have to jump in with both feet.

I enjoy building furniture with clean lines that is inspired by classic forms of American furniture - especially Queen Anne and Shaker. I also really enjoy studying early american craftsmanship and period furniture. I also enjoy making my own tools. My primary choice of wood is Cherry.

I am a pilot for Southwest Airlines and previously spent 13 years flying the A-10 Warthog. Although I live my life now in the gentile world of air transportation I am still a fighter pilot inside.


Ralph Brown

 Member Since: 2010

Member Since: 2010

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Charlie Edwards

 Member Since: 2010

Member Since: 2010

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David Blois

 Member Since: 2012

Member Since: 2012

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“What got me interested in woodworking?” is probably a great question for every Woodpecker.  In my case, I’m not sure if there is a quick answer.  I grew up in central Massachusetts and had the great experience of living close to two great-grandfathers who were woodworkers.  When I was twelve, sensing some interest, one of them gave me a lathe and a scroll saw.  Was it the interest or the tools that got me going??  With these tools, I was off and running in my quest to make things and acquire new knowledge – and of course new tools.

My professional career was in pharmaceutical research and development and I was able to maintain a wood shop throughout my 35 work-years, albeit with limited amounts of time.  I was always a self-taught woodworker.  After retirement, I enrolled in an Associate of the Arts (AA) program in Fine Woodworking at the Bucks County Community College in Pennsylvania.  After three years, I graduated with a much greater knowledge and appreciation of furniture design and techniques including veneering, bending, carving, chair making and architectural woodworking.  

Although I have made some period pieces, I mostly use my own designs, frequently inspired by Shaker pieces.  My favorite project, and one that I look at every day, is an elliptical dining table 7’ x 4’ made from a beautiful set of figured cherry from Pennsylvania.


John Reed

 Member Since: 2012

Member Since: 2012

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Bob Aaron

 Member Since: 2013

Member Since: 2013

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Don Keefer

 Member Since: 2013

Member Since: 2013

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Duncan Keir

 Member Since: 2013

Member Since: 2013

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Elmer Kreisel

 Member Since: 2014

Member Since: 2014

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Pat McCabe

 Member Since: 2014

Member Since: 2014

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Paul Leuba

 Member Since: 2014

Member Since: 2014

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I worked in the IT industry for 40 years in a variety of endeavors from computer operations, programming, systems engineering and general management.  Throughout my day job career I nurtured, as time would allow, a gradually developing skill set in woodworking by designing and building a variety of furniture pieces for the family's use at home.  I selected pieces to build for their utility to Pat, my wife, and our two boys.  Examples include a dining room table, bathroom vanity, entertainment cabinet, end table, night stand, shutters and a variety of shelves. My initial complement of power tools was a 9" Craftsman table saw and a 14" Delta drill press.  After I retired from full time work my interest was drawn to building Windsor chairs when I closely examined a hand crafted model on display at the Woodcraft store in Towson.  The chair was on display to advertise a forthcoming weekend class in Windsor chair construction taught by Mike Herrel from Columbus, OH.  I took the class, and have since built about a dozen chairs for use at home and as gifts to the family.  I continue to build Windsor chairs, and after recently purchasing a jointer and planer I plan to also design and build cabinetry and other household furniture.


Frank Duff

 Member Since: 2015

Member Since: 2015

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I enjoy 18th century Philadelphia chippendale pieces.  I enjoy the joinery, cabinetmaking and carving that style entails.  I do much of my work with hand tools and before starting a piece, spend time envisioning the processes a period cabinetmaker in Philadelphia or Baltimore might have used to produce the piece.  I have been building furniture for over 25 years. membership in the Society of American Period Furniture Makers and annual attendance at the Working Wood Conference in Williamsburg has afforded me the opportunity to learn a great deal of period processes and network with like minded individuals from all over the country. I have 40 years work experience as an engineer and program manager in the defense communications business.


Bill Marr

 Member Since: 2015

Member Since: 2015

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In 1984 a friend of mine introduced me to woodworking. He showed me various articles he made from wood he purchased at a lumber yard. I thought it was amazing what he could do with his tools and immediately began learning how to make my own things. Little did I know more than 30 years later my budding interest would turn into a long term passion for woodworking. In the beginning I would see a need for a book case, or a vanity and figure out how to make it and fit it into its final resting place (without any detailed plans). All the while gradually buying the tools I needed to make the article of the moment. Over time I purchased several books that broadened my horizon and began making things from plans. One such book, Classics from the New Yankee Workshop by Norm Abram, included a classic blanket chest and antique style rocking horse which I enjoyed making.
Over the years I’ve spent a lot of time learning about wood and how to use various tools to make objects for our home and for my family. The various project experiences I’ve had have given me the confidence to create my own designs and incorporate different joinery techniques for various things from small keepsake boxes to children’s toys. In recent years I have been learning how to use the lathe which has quickly become my favorite shop tool. Taking a piece of would be firewood and turning it into a tool, box, toy or even a bowl in one day yields immediate gratification. It’s almost equal to the pleasure I get in making the object and giving it to someone as a gift. The best part about woodworking for me is that there is always something to learn.
My wife Dukey and I live in Phoenix and have two children and six grandchildren that are the recipients of many of my efforts from the wood shop.


David Parker

 Member Since: 2015

Member Since: 2015

I am 66 years old and I’ve been retired for a few years now. Most of my career was spent in the defense industry beginning with the old Westinghouse facility in Linthicum, now Northup Grumman. My specialty was Project Management focusing on project scheduling and earned value management (like a report card for engineering projects). Most of these projects involved large, multi-million dollar programs. It was not a particularly popular position because neither the government nor the contractors liked being held accountable. I also spent time with SAIC on the Chem-Demil program, with Lockheed Martin on the Littoral Ships program, and with General Dynamics Robotic Systems.

Like many of us, it was childhood memories of my grandfather that got me interested in woodworking. Unfortunately, my family only visited during summer vacations, so I never had a chance to learn much. He had a closet that he called his workshop and only one person could fit in there at a time and yet he produced some beautiful and practical things. The only power tool he owned was a hand drill. They were depression era folks and I have fond memories of them cooking on a wood stove for years before my uncle insisted on buying them an electric stove. Cornbread was never the same after that. I have tried very hard to use hand tools and do things the way woodworker’s have always done them, but I confess I lack the patience to become proficient at it. Most of my projects have been flat board construction and I have only just recently started working with an old lathe (the one no-one wanted at a Woodpecker meeting last year- now I know why). My shop is in my basement. It is in great need of an upgrade. I still use the band saw and contractor table saw that were acquired almost thirty years ago and I keep promising myself I will get better tools just as soon as I master these.


George Adams

 Member Since: 2016

Member Since: 2016

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 I retired in 2009 from Verizon/Bell Atlantic/C&P Telco after 32 years working various technical and IT positions. Working paid the bills, work a little wood, retirement allows me to work wood pay a little of the bills.
I think my woodworking extends back to the days of my childhood. Seems like ever since I could hold a hammer I was building something, as a boy it was treehouses and go-carts. Today my woodworking projects would furniture, timber framing, sculptures, toys, even a go-cart, for my grandson this time. Most recently I have gotten interested in turning bowls and vessels.
I prefer to build from my own design verses following the plans of others. I also work with stained glass and find it fun to add a little glass into the furniture that I build.
If I had to pick a favorite style of furniture, I think it would be Contemporary Arts and Craft. An example of this and two furniture makers that I admire would be of Kevin Rodel and Garrett Hack. Both take traditional style furnishings and embellish with inlays, glass or contrasting woods.
My favorite woods to work are Walnut and cherry.


Paul Sleeper

 Member Since 2016

Member Since 2016

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I have been married to Corally for over 52 years, with two children and five grandchildren. Raised in Baltimore, went to Towson High school and then on to Purdue Univ. Upon graduation went to work in the energy industry (Exxon and a private oil company), living in five different cities before returning to Baltimore to join Constellation Energy for 16 years before retiring in 2014... Weather permitting love to play golf. Woodworking at my church building everything from stage sets to picture frames or in my home shop occupy my free hours.  
  I prefer to consider myself as more of a “generalist” than a “specialist” when it comes to woodworking. Really like to experiment with multiple types of projects learning new skills from joinery to finishing. Have built everything from three legged stools to occasional tables, clocks, cabinetry and bowl and spindle turnings. Haven’t yet tackled high end reproductions, maybe down the road!
I love the monthly meetings and seeing and hearing about what others are doing. Several occasions to join others for some short-term mentoring has been a real joy.


Rob Weber

 Member Since: 2016

Member Since: 2016

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I grew up in Annesley Maryland. It is an area of Baltimore County inside the beltway near York Road and Register avenue.  It was one of those Leave it to Beaver neighborhoods on a dead-end street. During college my dad was transferred to Denver and I spent some time in Colorado. I married my high school sweetheart during my senior year of college at the University of Baltimore.  My Lottery number was 15 in the first United States Draft Lottery and I joined the Army National Guard.  My degree was a BS in business from the University of Baltimore.  I have 2 daughters and 3 grandchildren.  I was a career salesman and spent 40+ year selling Medical Products. The coolest ones were Oxygenators for open-heart surgery, and Dialysis Equipment to clean the blood and remove fluid from kidney failure patients. 

Now I am retired & I spend my time with my hobbies, Grand Kids, & Traveling.  I like to Snow Ski, and I volunteer at the Living Classrooms in Baltimore City working in their Wood Shop.  The Living Classrooms is a foundation that works with inner city kids.  The wood shop program works with young men coming from the Juvenile system, and foster care in the city.  The program is called 'Fresh Start" They work with them to get their GED HIGH SCHOOL degree, teach them basic life skills, and Job placement support.  Right now, I am now helping them learn how to use the lathes they have.  God help us because I am just learning how to turn myself.  But it is more that they know and they seem to be happy for my help.  

I got interested in wood working when my dad built me a bookshelf. He was an engineer.  I think he gave me curiosity and his engineering outlook. I always want to know how things work. I started building serious furniture by assembling kits.  My first big project wan an "Emperor" Grandfather Clock kit. It had 80 precut parts. I finished it with stain and Tung oil. It turned out really well.  I was hooked, but it took about 25 more years for me to get really serious (Life, Kids, Career).  I also built a dining table for my daughter with legs and an apron from "Tablelegs.com".  I glued up the top with clamps I borrowed from a friend.  My family bought me a table saw in 2009 and I started getting serious. Since then I've set up a shop in my basement. I mostly like power equipment and tools. My hand tools are not always sharp enough, although I am learning to sharpen. About 5 months ago I bought a Lathe and l I'm learning to turn.  I'm turning bowls and tops with Bill Mars help. I am also in 2 clubs now, the Woodpeckers, and the Baltimore Area Wood turners.  Being associated with fellow Woodpeckers is great.  I like the fellowship and sharing knowledge. 

Things I've enjoyed building are, dining tables, Side Tables, a floating tabletop table, sideboards, a big screen TV cabinet, boxes, a full size-rocking cradle for my grandson, Adirondack chairs, stools, a "Live Edge" desk, and of course the baby doll cradles for the Holiday Toy Program we do.  I also enjoy harvesting wood from my back yard with a chain saw and turning that into a bowel blank on my band saw.  I look forward to learning new things and sharpening my skills. I'm not sure what the next big thing will be.  I'm always looking for inspiration.
 


Scon Boccuti

 Member Since: 2016

Member Since: 2016

Let me introduce myself: my name is Ascanio Boccuti.  Often my first name is shortened to "Scon" by my friends and colleagues. In my former life, I was a wills, trusts, and estates lawyer, practicing with a large firm in Baltimore. I've lived most of my life in Baltimore, and have been married for 55 years to my college sweetheart, Jean. We have 2 daughters and 3 grand-daughters, to whom I am officially known as "Mr. Fix-it." We have a family place in Garrett County, Maryland, which I visit year-round.  It's there that I have turned a 2-car garage into a wood workshop, the floor covered in chips.  I have loved making things out of wood since my initial experiences in high school shop classes.

My first major project, in the 1960's, was to put together and finish a teak "hi-fi" cabinet, right in the living room of our first apartment. It still sits proudly in a family rec room. It is difficult to choose a best project that I've completed over the years. It could be the building of my wooden kayak, which took 3 winter months, and which I now paddle frequently on Deep Creek Lake.  Or, maybe it's the cherry high-chair I made for the first grand-baby, which was used, without mercy for my craftmanship, by her and subsequent grand-girls. The "grands" also enjoyed being pulled along in the wooden slats wagon, or spending endless hours in the old-style chair swing.  Making children's gifts has provided me, and them, much pleasure.

One of my customs has been to make a birthday or Christmas present for family and friends, rather than to buy something for them. Last year it was wooden spoons, each one different. In previous years it was cutting boards and bagel holders for safe slicing.

Recently I've been making live-edged tables, from felled Western Maryland tree trunks. The slab I'm currently working on is from Meshach Browning's apple orchard. (He was a well-known Western Maryland hunter in the early 1800's.) Preserving the wood, creating the finish, giving new life to old chunks, and then giving the completed projects to others, provides me with great satisfaction.

I hope to keep on covering the floor with sweet smelling wood chips for as long as I can.  


Charlie Thomas

 Member Since: 2016

Member Since: 2016

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I am a retired mechanical engineer with a passion for woodworking. Back when I had a real job, I spent over 40 years in the design and manufacture of high speed large capital machinery for the paper industry.

My wife Meda and I have been married for over 55 great years. We have 3 children and 4 grandchildren.

In addition to woodworking, I like golf and occasionally play bridge.

I grew up on a farm where the tasks of building and fixing things ourselves was fairly commonplace. As a youngster, I had an uncle who lived with us who was quite crafty and talented in making things by hand. He taught me many underlying fundamentals of woodworking. One of these which stands out, was how to shape wood using the edge of a piece of broken glass as a scraper. Using this technique when I was about 8 years old I formed an ax handle which probably wasn't pretty, but one that we actually used. In spite of its looks, I was proud of it.
Currently, most of my woodworking projects are live edge tables. I use power tools whenever I can but I have a decent collection of chisels and carving tools which I use occasionally.

The project for me that was by far the most challenging was the design and building of a period reproduction Philadelphia highboy. This piece was built in the Chippendale style with 13 drawers, cabriole legs, ball and claw feet, curved goose neck moldings, and numerous carvings. The wood type was local cherry. This piece is far from perfect, but overall, I’m pleased with how it turned out. The overall project took over a year to complete.

My workshop is a converted dairy barn which is great since it provides plenty of space ---- but bad since this space allows me to purchase more machinery than I probably need. Some of the larger tools that I have include a 20-inch jointer/planer, a 20-inch bandsaw, a 14-inch sliding table saw, a lathe, and a shaper. I also have a Woodmizer bandsaw sawmill which I needed to move. Therefore, it is not currently set up for use. 

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